Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Health & Wellness’ Category

1*Zj9uncG8pFWb8ciS1WrKSA

Being mindful, is in essence, being fully in the present moment with a willingness and curiosity to be with ‘what is.’ It involves being aware of the physical sensations in your body, the thoughts in your mind, and the willingness to be with the full gamut of your emotions, as well as holding ALL of the above with compassion. If you are not practicing compassion with yourself or others, you are not practicing mindfulness.


a part of my series about “How To Develop Mindfulness And Serenity During Stressful Or Uncertain Times”, I had the pleasure of interviewing Life Coach and Inspiration and Wellness Specialist at Lake Austin Spa Resort, Julie Haber.

Julie brings over 25 years of experience in holistic living and a passion for helping others. She believes our most valuable wisdom comes from the experience of our own life. She likes to remind herself and others that the word inspiration comes from the Latin verb inspire, which means to ‘breathe into.’ She believes every experience we go through in life, whether challenging or enjoyable, gives us an opportunity to breathe into it.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Our readers would love to “get to know you” a bit better. Can you share with us the backstory about what brought you to your specific career path?

love this question! I would love to be able to say I had an epiphany or a bolt of light appeared one day and guided me to pursue the career path I am on now, but truthfully that was not how it went down at all. I came to this path from a place of pain and searching for answers. I was in need of healing having suffered from a long term autoimmune disease and multiple life disappointments. I knew I needed a combination of knowledge, healing and inspiration and was on a desperate search for that.

Can you share the most interesting story that happened to you since you started your career?

What stands out for me the most about my career path is that every person I have coached and helped has reflected back to me parts of my own self. The saying, ‘We teach what we most need to learn,’ has been so true for me. I believe I receive frequent blessings through working and serving others, as it often reminds me to apply what I share with others, to my own self. I love helping people find a path of peace, wellness and wisdom.

What advice would you give to other leaders about how to create a fantastic work culture?

There is so much more I could say about this, but to keep it short and simple, I believe there are three things necessary in order to create an optimum, productive, and inspired work culture.

  1. Express gratitude and appreciation for each other’s unique contributions.
  2. Commit to doing our personal best individually and collectively as a team, with a common shared purpose and vision to help others.
  3. Incorporate a collaborative leadership and conflict resolution model. Understand that conflict is natural and allows for growth and opportunity.

Is there a particular book that made a significant impact on you? Can you share a story or explain why it resonated with you so much?

‘The Alchemist’ by Paulo Coelho. It is the story of a young boy who goes out into the world with a personal vision. Many say he is too poor and young, and this is a ludicrous idea, but he holds fast to his dream. The idea being, if you believe and desire something, and your desire is pure, the whole universe will help and support you in the realization of your dream. It is a book about hope, and deeply encourages us to courageously and persistently move toward and fulfill our goals.

Ok, thank you for all that. Now let’s move to the main focus of our interview. From your experience or research, how would you define and describe the state of being mindful?

Being mindful, is in essence, being fully in the present moment with a willingness and curiosity to be with ‘what is.’ It involves being aware of the physical sensations in your body, the thoughts in your mind, and the willingness to be with the full gamut of your emotions, as well as holding ALL of the above with compassion. If you are not practicing compassion with yourself or others, you are not practicing mindfulness.

This might be intuitive to you, but it will be instructive to spell this out. Can you share with our readers a few of the physical, mental, and emotional benefits of becoming mindful?

Sure, there are many. Some of the physical benefits are lowered stress levels (which may, in turn, contribute to lowering the blood pressure), improved sleep, increased management for chronic pain, and brain health (an increase of gray matter- helpful for memory and learning as well as emotional regulation.) Some mental benefits: It can help us to think more clearly and make decisions more effectively, helps to decrease anxiety and worry, helps us to focus and not ruminate excessively. Some emotional benefits: A decrease in a sense of loneliness and isolation, more inspiration and a reported feeling of being more ‘centered’, feeling more connected to others because we feel more connected to our own self, as well as an overall deeper level of acceptance.

Ok. Here is the main question of our discussion. The past 5 years have been filled with upheaval and political uncertainty. Many people have become anxious from the dramatic jolts of the news cycle. The fears related to the coronavirus pandemic have only heightened a sense of uncertainty, anxiety, fear, and loneliness. From your experience or research what are five steps that each of us can take to develop mindfulness and serenity during such uncertain times? Can you please share a story or example for each.

Here are five simple mindfulness practices that can greatly benefit us during these unprecedented and uncertain times.

  1. Befriending Our Anxiety —  It is natural to feel anxious during unpredictable and uncertain times. Learn to accept and sit with your anxiety without pushing it away. Once you have identified that you are feeling anxious or fearful, allow some compassion for yourself. Compassion is both helpful and necessary before you take a step forward. So next time you feel anxious, rather than distract yourself with an escape or let your anxiety get out of control, simply say ‘Anxiety, I am aware you are here. Rather than push you away, I am going to accept that you are here and choose something that helps me to cope with you being here, rather than avoiding or denying your existence.’
  2. Mindful Eating —  Human beings have a habit of eating for comfort. Based on what I am hearing from people lately, there is a spike in eating for comfort now more than perhaps ever. When faced with uncertainty or turbulent times, we long for comfort. Usually under stress, people will eat more or sometimes eat less. I can tell by the amount of comments and memes on social media lately, that many are swinging toward the eating more than they need and are afraid of gaining weight in their search for being comfortable and the reality of being home more, and less on ‘the go.’ Practicing mindful eating can take many forms. Taking an opportunity to say a blessing over your food before eating, eating slowly and eating only what you need, choosing foods that feel comforting in a healthy way (instead of eating a bunch of sugar, baking a sweet potato, or having a sweet piece of whole fruit for instance.) Before you impulsively eat, take an inventory of your feelings and ask yourself, ‘What would feel truly nourishing right now?’ The other night I was reaching for some comfort food but I stopped myself to ask this question and I got that I needed love and comfort, so I called a close friend instead of downing a box of chocolate chip cookies or chips.
  3. Mindful Hand Washing — You would need to be hiding under a rock at this point to not have heard the clear instructions we have been given regarding the washing of our hands frequently for 20 seconds with hot water, so as not contract or spread the virus. Rather than just throw soap on your hands and unconsciously go through the motions, let yourself be fully present with this process. You can even turn it into a mindfulness ritual! Be present as you do this, enjoy it, say a prayer if you like. I have started to do the ‘meditation on loving kindness’ when I wash my hands, ‘May I be filled with loving kindness’, ‘May I be safe from inner and outer dangers’, ‘May I be well in body and mind’, ‘May I be at ease and happy’
  4. Mindful Awareness of Others —  During a pandemic it is easy to be concerned with our own immediate needs before we think of others. It requires extra effort to be mindful of others’ needs because our brains go into survival and fight or flight mode. This is so obvious when you go into a grocery store and you see people arguing over a roll of toilet paper. Practice mindful shopping. Ask yourself, if I were to expand my consciousness to get only what I need for the next week or two, what would I buy? This allows supplies to be left for other people who are in need of what you are in need of too.
  5. Mindful Routines — Even though many of us have had our schedules rearranged during this time, it is perhaps more essential than ever to have regular routines in place. Routine and sticking to a schedule will help to provide the necessary structure and comfort during these times of uncertainty and upheaval. It is so easy to stay up late ‘and sleep in’ and walk around in your pajamas all day when you are confined to your home, but if you can instead stick to a schedule that allows for continuity, you will receive the tremendous benefit. If you are working from home, get dressed in something comfortable but presentable — this will allow you to have the proper mindset. Make sure to have time for Mindful Exercise too! Having some type of exercise is essential. I am lucky to live on a greenbelt where I can go for a nature walk and it is easy to keep a social distance. If you can, get some fresh air and be out in nature. If this is not possible, make sure you are getting regular exercise at home. I did a wonderful nature walk, where I looked for beautiful and peaceful sights on my walk yesterday. I saw a red cardinal, a beautiful sunset, an inchworm, a butterfly, water running in the creek, clouds moving, new green leaves sprouting, and wildflowers blooming. I believe this was immune-boosting and stress-reducing. I call being mindful of beauty!

From your experience or research, what are five steps that each of us can take to effectively offer support to those around us who are feeling anxious? Can you explain?

  1. Listen and be present for others, rather than fix or problem solve. I am noticing that during this stressful time, people need to be allowed to vent without being interrupted. Lend an ear or call a friend to check-in.
  2. Be on the lookout for those who may need extra support: Offer grocery support to the elderly and the physically compromised, be mindful of those who are suddenly watching or homeschooling their kids full time, they may need to vent! Be aware of those less fortunate who have less income, resources or are more at risk. Let them know you have their back (from a healthy 6 to 10 feet distance of course!)
  3. Gently help others reframe what they wish they had but don’t, into what they do have — in other words, practice gratitude. For instance, ‘Well they did not have the organic blueberries at the store, but they did have the oatmeal I wanted.’ Or, ‘My kids are driving me crazy, but I am happy we have this chance as a family to spend more time together, this a time that will always be remembered!’
  4. Remind others of the simple superpower they have of mindful breathing! Conscious breathing is free and is one of the best, if not THE best ways of soothing an anxious mind and body. Invite your friends to breathe with you — start by inhaling for four counts, hold the breath for two counts, and exhale for six counts. When we breathe through the nose and it helps to bring more oxygen into our brains, which in turn helps emotional regulation and optimum steps forward.
  5. Practice mindful brainstorming. For instance, if you have a friend who just lost a significant portion of their income due to this pandemic and is feeling anxious and fearful as a result, ask them if they would like to mindfully brainstorm some options with you. There is not just one answer to how to live a successful and meaningful life. Get out a pen and paper and let yourself free associate all the possible options. No option is too far fetched of an idea. When we go through times of stress and constriction, we are often led to places where we have to step out of our comfort zone and grow. Losing a job could mean starting the business you have always wanted to start but were too afraid to, for instance!

What are the best resources you would suggest for someone to learn how to be more mindful and serene in their everyday life?

I have always been a big fan of the Dummy and Idiot books. They are clear, provide excellent instruction, and have lots of resources and plentiful humor. Check out ‘Mindfulness for Dummies.’ Or ‘The Complete Idiots Guide to Mindfulness.’

Jon Kabat-Zinn, founder of MBSR (mindfulness-based stress reduction) is also an excellent instructor and resource. Check out his website for some guided meditations and instruction at mindfulnesscds.com

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Do you have a story about how that was relevant in your life?

In times of stress, it seems everyone is happy to give you advice on what YOU should do based on THEIR OWN trajectory. I personally have found this very confusing, as what is true for someone else may not be true for me. I am sure we have all had moments of taking someone else’s advice and then regretting it later because we were not true to ourselves, or even more seriously, we betrayed our own self. For this reason, one of my all-time favorite quotes is ‘Be Yourself Everyone Else Is Taken’ by Oscar Wilde. I find that when I am true to me, and let myself truly and unapologetically be me, I have less stress and more of a sense of peace and fulfillment in my life.

You are a person of great influence. If you could start a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

I am currently in the process of creating my version and vision of how to spread as much goodness to as many people as possible. The website is under progress and will be coming soon (provided that I breathe deep and let go of perfectionism.) I believe it is essential for our health, wellbeing and ultimately the happiness of our world that we realize we are all connected and that we learn to simultaneously get very good at taking care of ourselves while forming strong partnerships and connection with others. We are all one family! If this pandemic has taught us anything, it is that we are all connected!

Source: Medium

Read Full Post »

WhiteBloodCells

Read Full Post »

Source: YouTube

Read Full Post »

Johnny Light, Editor’s Note: A must see primer on how the human body protects against disease and how stress shuts down the immune system.

Source: YouTube

Read Full Post »

meditation-3338549_1280IN BRIEF

  • The Facts:Below, you will find 8 paths as described in the second book (out of four) of the Yoga Sutras, written by the Indian sage Patanjali about two thousand years ago.
  • Reflect On:The practice of yoga involves much more than the physical aspect of what many people do today.

Yoga is something that continues to gain a tremendous amount of popularity throughout the world as we move through 2015 and beyond. It’s not a religion, and it is used and practiced by theists, atheists, and everyone in between. There are two major components of yoga that are now being practiced in the West today: physical fitness through stretching (asana), and mental fitness through the practice of meditation (dhyana).

Many in the West do not know that for thousands of years, the true nature of yoga was to achieve states of insightfulness that helped to reveal the true nature of Reality, “before personal biases and cultural expectations have a chance to distort our perceptions.” (1)

Yoga predates Hinduism by centuries, possibly millennia, and is closely associated with Jainism and Buddhism. Its origins can be traced back three to five thousand years ago.

Below, you will find 8 paths as described in the second book (out of four) of the Yoga Sutras, written by the Indian sage Patanjali about two thousand years ago. I thought it would be useful to share, as reflecting on these teachings, for some people, can really improve mental states and life in general.

“The second book of the Yoga Sutras describes the practice of yoga. The goal of practice is to break out of the destructive habits that distract the mind and in turn create suffering. Patanjali describes a method known as ashtanga, or the eightfold path.” Dean Radin, PhD., Chief Scientist At The Institute of Noetic Sciences (1)

Here they are:

Path 1 is Yama: Restraining from harmful behaviour, or cautions on what behaviour to avoid. This includes violence, injury, telling falsehoods, stealing, lasciviousness, greed, and in general adopting ethical and virtuous behaviour.

Path 2 is Niyama: Developing beneficial behaviour, or guidelines on what behaviours to encourage. This includes cleanliness and austerity, along with cultivating an attitude of gratitude and contentment, and being engaged in a disciplined practice of focus, devotion, and self-study.

Path 3 is Asana: Developing of physical postures. These are designed to assist the mind and body in relaxing, through development of strength, steadiness, and flexibility. The purpose of the asanas is to prepare the body to comfortably withstand the rigors of long-term meditation.

Path 4 is Pranayama: Conscious breathing techniques. These further the mind’s ability to focus, and they energize the body.

Path 5 is Pratyhara: Withdrawing from ordinary sensory perceptions and limiting focus to a single object of attention. Restricting one’s attention frees the mind to concentrate on internal objects of attention, fostering even more tranquility of mind.

Path 6 is Dharana: Developing a steady, sustained concentration. The root word for dhri in dharana means “to hold”; one holds attention on a single object of thought. This type of concentration is similar to that experienced during highly focused intellectual work.

Path 7 is Dhyana: Developing prolonged levels of concentration on an object, with deeper absorption and greater sustained alertness. This is sometimes referred to as meditation.

Path 8 is Samadhi: Unity or mystical absorption with an object of attention. In this state, distinctions between subject and object dissolve and one “becomes” the object of meditation. This awareness is frequently described as ecstatic. That is, it is a super-aware state accompanied by intense, nonsensual pleasure.

Source: Collective Evolution & (1) Radin, Dean. Supernormal: Science, Yoga and the Evidence For Exraordinary Psychic Abilities. New York, Deepak Chopra Books , 2013

Read Full Post »

By Azlan White

Here’s some of the information we do know from the only book in the world on the topic. Keep this information in the back of your mind as it may one day help save you or someone you know.

Most people are aware taking potassium iodide (KI) or potassium iodate (KIO3) tablets will help block your thyroid gland from absorbing radioactive iodine should there ever be a dirty bomb explosion or nuclear power plant mishap such as the Three Mile Island incident. In 1999, another such accident happened in Tokaimura, Japan where several individuals died from radiation exposure in a fuel processing facility.

What people don’t recognize is that potassium iodide or iodate tablets only protect the thyroid gland and do not provide protection from any other radiation exposure, so taking them should not give you a false sense of security. It’s important to detox your body after radioactive exposure!

One question is, what do you do if KI or KIO3 tablets aren’t available during an emergency? Interestingly enough, according to research by Ken Miller, health physicist at the Hershey Medical Center, he found that an adult could get a blocking dose of stable iodine by painting 8 ml of a 2 percent tincture of Iodine on the abdomen or forearm approximately 2 hours prior to I-131 contamination. Potassium iodine tablets are best, but if they’re not available this is the next best thing.

An entirely different problem arises after you’ve been exposed to radioactive contamination because now you have to get rid of any radioactive particles you may have ingested through the air you breathed, water you drank, or food you ate. Some people suggest Epson salt, Clorox or clay baths to remove any residues on your skin and to leach out any heavy metals you may have absorbed, but the big worry is internal contamination. To gain some insights into what to do, we have to turn to the story of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki.

At the time of the atomic bombing, Tatsuichiro Akizuki, M.D. was Director of the Department of Internal Medicine at St. Francis’s Hospital in Nagasaki and he fed his staff and patients a strict diet of brown rice, miso and tamari soy soup, wakame, kombu and other seaweed, Hokkaido pumpkin, and sea salt. He also prohibited the consumption of sugar and sweets since they suppress the immune system.

By imposing this diet on his staff and patients, no one succumbed to radiation poisoning whereas the occupants of hospitals located much further away from the blast incident suffered severe radiation fatalities. Much of this positive result has to do with the fact that the This is why seaweed sales usually skyrocket after radiation disasters, and why various seaweeds and algae are typically used to treat radiation victims. sea vegetables contain substances that bind radioactive particles and escort them out of the body.

In Chernobyl, for instance, spirulina was used to help save many children from radiation poisoning. By taking 5 grams of spirulina a day for 45 days, the Institute of Radiation Medicine in Minsk even proved that children on this protocol experienced enhanced immune systems, T-cell counts and reduced radioactivity. Israeli scientists have since treated Chernobyl children with doses of natural beta carotene from Dunaliella algae and proved that it helped normalize their blood chemistry. Chlorella algae, a known immune system builder and heavy metal detoxifier, has also shown radioprotective effects. Because they bind heavy metals, algae should therefore be consumed after exposure to any type of radioactive contamination.

In 1968 a group of Canadian researchers at McGill University of Montreal, headed by Dr. Stanley Skoryna, actually set out to devise a method to counteract the effects of nuclear fallout. The key finding from their studies was that sea vegetables contained a polysaccharide substance, called sodium alginate, which selectively bound radioactive strontium and eliminated it from the body.

Sodium alginate is found in many seaweeds, especially kelp, and since that time the Russians have been seriously researching the use of their own kelps from Vladivlostok, from which they have isolated the polysaccharide U-Fucoidan, which is another radioactive detoxifier.

Miso soup was so effective in helping prevent radiation sickness, the Japanese have also done research identifying the presence of an active ingredient called zybicolin, discovered in 1972, which acts as a binding agent to also detoxify and eliminate radioactive elements (such as strontium) and other pollutants from the body.

The kelps and algaes aren’t the only natural foods with radio-detoxifying effects. In terms of fluids to drink, BLACK AND GREEN TEA have shown “radioprotective effects” whether consumed either before or after exposure to radiation. This anti-radiation effect was observed in several Japanese studies, and studies from China also suggest that the ingredients in tea are radioactive antagonists.

In short, after any sort of radioactive exposure you want to be eating seaweeds and algaes along with almost any type of commercial heavy metal chelating formula to bind radioactive particles and help escort them out of the body. Whether you’re worried about depleted uranium, plutonium or other isotopes, this is the wise thing to do which can possibly help, and certainly won’t hurt. Many nutritional supplements have been developed for the purpose of detoxifying heavy metals, most of which contain the algaes and plant fibers and other binding substances.

Basically, an anti-radiation diet should focus on the following foods:

  • Miso soup
  • Spirulina, chlorella and the algaes (kelp, etc.)
  • Brassica vegetables and high beta carotene vegetables
  • Beans and lentils
  • Potassium, calcium and mineral rich foods
  • High nucleotide content foods to assist in cellular repair ncluding spirulina, chlorella, algae, yeast, sardines, liver, anchovies and mackerel
  • Cod liver oil and olive oil
  • Avoid sugars and sweets and wheat
  • A good multivitamin/multimineral supplement

Yet another benefit of the sea vegetables rarely discussed is their high mineral content, which is a bonus in the case of radioactive exposure. Consuming natural iodine, such as in the seaweeds, helps prevent the uptake of iodine-131 while iron inhibits the absorption of plutonium-238 and plutonium-239. Vitamin B-12 inhibits cobalt-60 uptake (used in nuclear medicine), zinc inhibits zinc-65 uptake and sulfur is preventative for sulfur-35 (a product of nuclear reactors) incorporation by the body.

Since nuclear workers are potentially exposed to radioactive sulfur, this means that workers in the atomic power industry need a higher content of sulfur in their diet. MSM supplements provide a source of dietary sulfur, but thiol supplements such as cysteine, lipoic acid and glutathione serve double-duty in this area because they help detoxify the body and attack all sorts of other health problems as well.

The immune system is usually hit hard after radiation exposure, and a number of steps can be taken to help prevent opportunistic infections after a radioactive incident. Though the full dimensions of the protective mechanism is still unknown, Siberian ginseng is one form of ginseng that exerts a definite radioprotective effect and has been demonstrated to lessen the side effects of radiation. It was widely distributed by the Soviet Union to those exposed Chernobyl radiation and is commonly used to help cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy.

Consuming Reishi mushrooms is another proven way to bolster your immune system after radiation exposure and helps reduce the damage from radiation. It’s been used to decrease radiation sickness in animals and help them recover faster after potentially deadly exposure.

Panax ginseng has prevented hemorrhaging after radiation exposure, prevents bone marrow death and stimulates blood cell formation, so it’s another supplement to add to one’s protocol. In short, yeasts, beta glucans, bee pollen and various forms of ginseng have all been shown to bolster the immune system after radiation incidents. In terms of radiation burns, aloe vera has a proven ability to treat serious radiation burns and offers other radioprotective effects, and can easily be grown in your house.

The amino acid L-Glutamine can be used to help repair the intestine in case of the gastrointestinal syndrome usually suffered due to radiation exposure, and a variety of substances can help rebuild blood cells to prevent hematopoietic syndrome. Those particular foods include beet juice, liver extract, spleen extract, and shark alkyglycerols. Most oncologists don’t know that shark liver oil, with alkyglycerols, can help platelet counts rebound in days.

Depleted uranium is currently in the journalistic spotlight because US weapons are made from this material, and after being fired leave a legacy of depleted uranium dust in the environment, which anyone can absorb.

Because the kidneys are usually the first organs to show chemical damage upon uranium exposure, military manuals suggest doses or infusions of sodium bicarbonate to help alkalinize the urine if this happens. This makes the uranyl ion less kidney-toxic and promotes excretion of the nontoxic uranium carbonate complex.

In areas contaminated by depleted uranium dusts, it therefore makes sense to switch to drinking slightly alkaline water and to favor a non-acidic diet to assist in this detoxification. Any of the heavy metal detoxifiers, such as miso soup, chlorella, spirulina and seaweeds, are also commonsense warranted.

Another thing you can do is use homeopathics for radiation exposure. People commonly argue over whether homeopathics work or not, but if you assume the position that they produce no results whatsoever then you must also assume that they certainly won’t hurt you, which means the only loss from using them is a few dollars.

Frankly, there are countless cases and double-blind studies where homeopathic tinctures do provoke physical healing effects in the body. Therefore they are a viable adjunct treatment option. One homeopathic, in particular, is URANIUM NITRICUM (nitrate of uranium) which homeopaths suggest should be used in cases of depleted uranium exposure or uranium poisoning. Not just soldiers or civilians exposed to battlefield dusts, but uranium miners and radiation workers may find it quite useful.

While we’ve discussed just a few of the many supplements and protocols you can use to help detox the body of the lingering results of radioactive contamination, including the residues of depleted uranium, the last thing that might be of interest is that there is a plant that is a natural geiger counter. The spiderwort plant is so sensitive to changes in radiation levels (its petals change color upon exposure) that it’s often used as a natural radiation detector (dosimeter), just as they use canaries in mines as detectors of poisonous gas. Some people like knowing that they have an ongoing monitoring system for radiation in the environment, and this is just another tip available in “How to Neutralize the Harmful Effects of Radiation or Radioactive Exposure.”

Source:  San Francisco Medical Research Foundation

Resources:

Read Full Post »

By Deepak Chopra

Consider that the human body consists of approximately one hundred trillion cells, about one thousand cells for every bright star in the Milky Way. It takes only fifty replications, starting with the one-celled fertilized ovum, to produce those one hundred thousand billion cells.  The first replication gives you two cells. The second replication gives you four. The third replication gives you sixteen cells, and so on. By the fiftieth replication, you have one hundred thousand billion cells in your body, and that’s where the replication stops.

So all of the cells of your body start from just one cell. That one cell replicates and replicates, and somewhere along the line the cells differentiate. There are some 250 different  types of cells in the human body, from the spherical simple fat cell to the thin, branching nerve cell. Scientists still have no idea how that one cell ends up dividing into so many different kinds of cells, which then are able to organize themselves into a stomach, a brain, skin, teeth, and all the other highly specialized parts of the body.

In addition to doing its specific job in the body, each cell does a few million things per second just to keep functioning: creating proteins, adjusting the permeability of its membrane, and processing nutrients, to name just a few. Each cell also has to know what every other cell is doing otherwise your body would fall apart. The human body can function only if it is operating synchronistically, and all this can happen only through non-local correlation. How else could one hundred trillion cells each doing one millions things per second coordinate their activities so as to support a living, breathing human being? How else could a human body generate thoughts, remove toxins, and smile at a baby, or even make a baby, all at the same time?

In order to wiggle my toes, first I have the thought that I’d like to do so. The thought activates my brain cortex, which then sends a nerve impulse down through the spinal cord into my legs and moves my toes. That in itself is miraculous. Where did the thought come from? Before the thought, there was no energy, but as soon as I had the thought and the intention to wiggle my toes, it created a controlled electromagnetic storm in my brain, which transferred down the nerve, and caused it to discharge a certain chemical. Then my toes wiggled. That’s a very linear, mechanical, and local phenomenon – except for that very first part, the thought that started it all. How did the thought first create the electricity? Scientists understand the body’s mechanisms – action potential, neurotransmitters, and muscular contractions, all of it. But no one can show through experiment where the thought came from. The thought cannot be seen, but without it, we would be paralyzed. No thought, no toe-wiggling. Somehow your awareness becomes information and energy. Where does that happen?

The answer is that the thought originates in the virtual domain.

Source: The Spontaneous Fulfillment of Desire: Harnessing the Power of Coincidence by Deepak Chopra

Read Full Post »